The One Takeaway Everyone Should Get From Last Weeks Riots-

Therefore, repent and return, so that your sins may be wiped away, in order that times of refreshing may come from the presence of the Lord- Acts 3:10 NASB 

 Like every other human with a shred of decency I have watched the events of the last ten days unfold in horrified shock. It all began with the cruel and indefensible death of George Floyd on May 25th. Most of the reaction to his death was rational and healthy. However, some let their anger foment into violent protests, anarchy, looting and attacks on police officers and innocent bystanders.  It ended (more or less) with the National Guard being called into many cities. Sunday evening my own normally peaceful mid-size city was overrun with angry protesters and senseless violence.

 Monday, I began seeking God in earnest regarding the situation. Because I’m me, I like to know the root cause of every issue. Consequently, the first question I had for the Lord was why? Why does it always come back to race in this country? Why is racism such an oozy, festering, wound here? America is not the only place racism is a problem. The Apostle Paul repeatedly addressed the issue of racism in his writings (Galatians 3:28, Colossians 3:9-11, Ephesians 2:11-17). I doubt he would have felt compelled to do so if the problem were not hard baked into the human condition. That said, America has a different kind of problem with racism than most other countries. I think this is because America’s bigotry was born out of oppression and cruelty rather than garden-variety prejudice. Nonetheless, it seems we should be a little further along in the healing process. A lot has been done in the last five decades to try and right the wrongs of slavery and Jim Crow.  

 Then, it occurred to me the whole ugly muddle is an example of what happens anytime anyone refuses to be sorry for their sins.      

 The generation that fought to keep slavery legal certainly did not apologize for their sins. Instead, the whole lot of them collectively refused to be even the tiniest bit remorseful. Their sin was compounded by the fact they knew better. People who lived in America at that time were well-acquainted with Christian ethics and principles (Luke 6:31, Hebrews 13:16). The all-encompassing moral code of Christianity is that Christians are to treat people the way they wish to be treated (Matthew 7:12). It really is that simple. Literally, no one wants to be a slave. Therefore, forcing another person into slavery is clearly immoral. Post-Civil War clergy could have advanced the healing process if they had been willing to preach repentance. Instead pastors passively and actively endorsed the bigoted behavior of the people they were called to lead to better things (Hebrews 6:9).  

 Then the thing happened that always happens when a person or group of people willfully refuses to confess they were wrong and be sorry for their sins. They passed down a vile, sinister, festering generational sin to their children.  The generations that followed made a terrible situation worse by institutionalizing bigotry through the passing of Jim Crow laws.

 Then the thing happened that always happens when a person or group of people is sinned against repeatedly without apology. Their hurt becomes a festering woundedness that is passed down to the next generation. When hurt is passed down for generations bitterness can begin to feel like a birthright. As a victim of an entirely different form of generational woundedness I have learned forgiveness is the only path to wholeness and peace.  I understand from personal experience forgiving generational sin is hard because it feels as if we are excusing the inexcusable simply by letting go and giving our rage to God. That being said, it must be done.

 I am not stupid or prideful enough to think I can solve the problem of racism or the generational suffering caused by the evils of bigotry in one blogpost. As if. That feat would be categorically above my rather meager paygrade. All I can really do is pray for healing for those wounded by racism. I can make it my aim to live a life that sees people first and color second. I can be fair to others, I can choose to judge others based on the content of their character rather than the color of their skin. I can call out injustice when I see it, rather than simply turning a blind eye to evil.

 We live in a time and place that screams for individual self-examination.  

 Not all people are racists. If you fall into that classification, the only acceptable course is repentance, you will be judged by God if you refuse to do so. That said, racism is not the only sin that ruins lives and produces generational mayhem, every choice has a consequence, especially the choice to keep sinning or to hang on to anger (Hebrews 10:26-31, Hebrews 12:15).  Any sin we choose not to repent of or any wound we do not take to God for healing has the potential to cause the same kind of ugly ripples racism has.

 Do the future a favor and take a hard look at your life and attitudes. If you need to repent—do it. If you need to forgive a sin that was perpetrated against you— do it.

Now. 

Future generations deserve better.

 

 

One thought on “The One Takeaway Everyone Should Get From Last Weeks Riots-

  1. If you think this is about race, you are wrong. I don’t tend to buy into crazy schemes, but I really believe that this is very underhanded. Things I’m seeing indicate that George Soros is funding antifa, who is basically a professional Riot gang, to seed themselves through crowds and make things worse. And that’s just the beginning of it. racism was just a convenient step to take to get this moving. I truly don’t believe we’ve seen the end of this. If we are not as a nation hitting our knees and coming against us in prayer, this is going to go in horrible directions. It already is, but I think there are things coming that we can’t even imagine that are going to be horrific. They just want us to think that is racism, so that they can do what they want to do as we’re distracted with that.

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