A Wise Life

A blog by Lisa M. Price

Okay, so, I am a little more familiar with the sin of bitterness than I or anyone else probably ought to be. I actually consider myself to be something of an expert on the topic.

Sigh.

Bitterness is not a subject that gets discussed much in church-y circles. It should be, because my experiences are not all that unique or special. Bitterness is one of those ugly little sins no one wants to own-up to but that we all struggle with at some point in our lives.

 One of the stranger things that was once considered a good thing (or at least a neutral thing) that has become a bad thing is cultural appropriation. Cultural appropriation is the practice of borrowing (some would say stealing) the best aspects of a culture and appropriating or adopting those things into another culture. Ancient Romans were among the first to appropriate other cultures but Americans have perfected the practice. That is why Americans can say with a straight face that something is as “American as apple pie” when apples are from Asia and the practice of baking apples into pies began in England during the Middle Ages.

It has become nauseatingly trendy for Christians to declare passionately that they love Jesus but hate the church and all the people in it. They feel justified (even righteous) in saying these things because they believe that all Christians (other than themselves of course) are hateful, judgmental and pretentious. They also nearly always believe that the church is simply a misguided, human-run organization that has nothing at all to do with God or Jesus.

Insert eye roll here.

 According to both Roman and Jewish law Joseph had every right to publicly divorce (and humiliate) Mary. They were married and he had what appeared to be incontrovertible proof of infidelity. Her story about the angel was, by every standard, well, more than a little crazy. Most of us would have felt justified in publicly shaming a woman who slept with another man and then told a ridiculously outlandish tale about God and angels to cover-up her indiscretion.

 Seriously.  

 Some believe that unchurched people avoid church because the stuff we do in church is simply too complicated for them to understand. Champions of this theory believe that the solution to Christianity’s dwindling conversion rate is to simplify and explain the heck out of how and why we do what we do in church. They sincerely believe that non-Christians will go to church if churches will remove any language or ritual that anyone who is not already acquainted with church might find even vaguely baffling.

Don’t judge others for being real-

Just don’t. Judgment kills intimacy and destroys community. Our role as Christians is to encourage, correct, redirect and cheer-lead (Galatians 6:1, Hebrews 3:13, 2nd Timothy 2:24-26). Leave the judgments to God. He knows more than you do.

In recent months, I have noted a clear trend regarding the subject matter of many of the blogs I subscribe to. All of them have been encouraging Christians to be bolder in their pursuit of authentic and meaningful friendships with sinners (their word, not mine). A few have openly shamed other Christians for not having and pursuing more intimate friendships with non-Christians.

I recently read about a group of women who have decided it is a heinous form of cultural appropriation for white women to wear hoop earrings (yes, you read that correctly). These women have posted some utterly intriguing rants describing in vivid detail exactly how offended they are that white women wear hoop earrings.

Seriously. You can Google it.

I hate that social media has made it possible for lies and fake news to spread quicker than germs do. I hate that social media has made it easy for people to isolate themselves from ideas that stretch their thinking. I hate how it’s possible to “unfriend” a real live person without so much as a discussion as to why.

And finally,

The thing I hate most about social media is how stinking easy it is to be mean.

The second lie is essentially the converse of the first lie, that it is somehow more “authentic” or “real” to say what needs to be said in the bluntest and in some cases rudest way possible. Those who have bought into this drivel confuse political correctness with respect and believe that the only honest speech is raw speech. In my experience “raw speech” or “honest speech” is frequently just a thin cover for intentionally aggressive and cruel speech.