Five Critically Important Things a Crisis Will Steal From Us if We Allow It-

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly- John 10:10 ESV

It could be argued that life is nothing more than a long series of crises punctuated by brief moments of peace and tranquility. Jesus straight-up admitted as much in John 16:33 when He promised we would have trouble in this world.

 Because trouble and hardship are a given. Christians who want to make a difference in this world must become skilled at managing crisis’s with faith, grace and a least a measure of dignity. This is no small task.  Doing so requires wisdom and unceasing prayer (Colossians 4:21st Thessalonians 5:17). 

 One of the many lessons I learned this week as I struggled to manage a series of weird little disasters is that one aspect of handling crisis’ well is understanding that the enemy is eager to steal some things from us in crisis situations. The good news is Satan can’t take any of those things from us without our cooperation. God allows us to decide whether or not we are going to concede five things in a crisis:

 Our peace-

 The biggest difference between a Christian and a non-Christian (besides where they spend eternity) is a Christian has the power not just to appear peaceful in a tragedy but to actually be at peace in the face of chaos and deep personal pain (John 14:27, Romans 8:6, Colossians 3:15). Because peace is the one visible trait separating believers from unbelievers, the enemy does everything possible to steal the peace that is our birthright as Christians. The enemy wants to send Christians spinning (metaphorically speaking) in a way that is visible to other people because this causes non-Christians to believe God is either imaginary or weak and ineffective. We hold on to peace by choosing to focus on the good God has done in the past and is currently doing in our lives. Then we must discipline ourselves to pray about our situation rather than worrying about it. Finally, we must look for things to be thankful for even when life is tougher than we wish it was (Philippians 4:6-9)

 Our faith-

 Faith in God does three very powerful things. Faith saves sinners from their sin (Acts 20:21, Ephesians 2:8, Hebrews 10:39). Faith causes Christians to act on behalf of others even when it is not in their best interest to do so (James 2:18-25). Finally, faith acts as a witness of God’s existence (Hebrews 11:1). When unbelievers see Christians act in faith it provides evidence God is real. Because faith is such a powerful thing, stealing our faith in times of crisis is a high priority of the enemy.   We keep our faith intact by meditating on how God came through for us in the past and by asking God to show us how He is working on our behalf in the present. Faith is a gift God will us if we ask for it (1st Corinthians 12:8-10).

 Our ability to think and reason-

 The ability to think and reason is perhaps the greatest gift God gives people. The ability to reason keeps people from acting out of instinct and causing themselves or others harm in scary situations. Because human beings are made in the image of God Satan hates humans with a foul and unholy passion. Therefore, he wants people to act rashly and hurt themselves. We keep from doing ourselves harm by intentionally slowing down in a crisis and doing nothing until we have prayed fervently over our next move. As we slow down and pray we become capable of separating feelings from facts. This empowers us to calmly and rationally think through all the available options rather than the ones that look or feel obvious and easy. Remember, obvious and easy are nearly always the worst possible options in a crisis.

 Our compassion for others-  

 Hard times either cause us to care more about people than we ever did before or they cause us to become incredibly selfish, judgmental and self-protective even after the crisis has passed. We maintain our compassion for others by asking God every single day to give us the ability to see people the way He sees them.

 Our Problem solving abilities-

 We lose our ability to problem-solve anytime we look too far down the road and focus on what might happen rather than the problem we have in front of us (Matthew 6:25-34). Concern for the future is wise (Proverbs 21:5). However, when we allow ourselves to become fixated on what might possibly happen if we do this or that we lose the power to envision a future without problems. This keeps us stuck in an endless loop of what-ifs. What-ifs are one of Satan’s favorite playgrounds.

 If we can hold onto the things Satan wants to steal from us in a crisis, we will go through the it with our faith and dignity intact. We will also come out the other side praising God for His goodness and better equipped to help others with the trouble life inevitably brings.   

 

 

 

Five Truths Every Christian Must Grasp to be Whole, Happy and Spiritually Productive-

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things~ Philippians 4:8 NIV

 I have been “cursed” with a temperament that tends to overthink just about everything. I also veer towards thinking a lot about a lot of different issues. There is literally no end to the number of random thoughts and ideas that flit through my mind in a given day. Regrettably, I do not have a mind like a steel trap. As a result, most of those thoughts and ideas depart as quickly as they appear.

All that being said, occasionally someone will say something that will cause a random thought to take root and I will spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about a subject and that subject makes its way into a blog post. 

Such was the case this past week. 

 We have teenager in our home who states at least six times a day that she “just didn’t think” about something. The things the girl does not think about are things most people think about all the time without even realizing they are thinking about them. Her curiously vexing acknowledgement has gotten me thinking a great deal about the subject of thinking. More specifically, I have been thinking about how what we think about (or don’t think about) shapes who we become and what we do. In the NASB version of the Bible Proverbs 23:7 says that what a man thinks about he eventually becomes and Jesus further expresses the same idea in Mark 7:21 when He states that evil thoughts always precede evil behavior. 

 Very few (if any) Christians are inclined toward the kind of thinking that leads to openly evil behavior. Rather, most Christians tend towards the kind of wrong thinking that leads to misguided or incorrect behavior. The problem with misguided or incorrect behavior committed by Christians is that it almost always leads to a kind of passive evil that hurts people on an eternal level because it is done in the name of religion. The bottom line on this issue is that what Christians choose to think about matters. I came up with five random things I believe we should all think about on a regular basis because if we don’t we suffer and so does everyone else.  

Beginning with:   

People really can change-

The gospel (good news) of Jesus Christ is about far more than simply sidestepping an eternity spent in hell (although that message is definitely in there). The really good news of the gospel is that sinful, dirty, mucked-up human beings can be entirely transformed into new people with new desires and new attitudes when they put their faith and trust in Jesus Christ (Romans 12:2, 2ndCorinthians 3:18, 2ndCorinthians 5:17). When we forget this categorically startling truth it diminishes the churches power to transform the culture because we tend to sideline those Christians we deem less desirable due to their lack of education, past mistakes or upbringing. It also keeps individuals from personally seeking the radical transformation necessary for every Christian to reach their full potential in Jesus. 

God loves people we don’t love just as much as He loves us-

God loves all of us in spite of our idiocy, faults, weaknesses and inability to pull it together and get the job done. That means that God wants the ridiculous, bothersome, entirely not self-aware people in our lives to learn from their mistakes, grow in their relationships and become better people. He might even be using us to orchestrate those things in their lives. Keep this truth at the forefront of your mind next time another Christian starts to bug you.  

 Feelings are mostly wrong-

Recently, a real live human (a Christian) told me with a straight face that if they “felt that something was true their feelings made it true”. I will not lie, it took me a minute to recover my bearings. I am categorically unaccustomed to hearing that kind of bold-faced insanity being spoken aloud. Once I recovered, I quickly pointed out that two people can have opposing feelings about the exact same issue or situation.  When that kind of conflict develops it has to be an agreed upon set of facts that becomes the deciding factor in what is true. If any other standard becomes the norm we will devolve into moral and intellectual chaos.

Politics and religion are not equal-

I have some strong political views, most of them are solidly conservative. I try to base my views on biblical truth rather than my feelings or what our Western culture believes about a particular issue. However, even with those qualifiers my political views are not on the same level as my religious beliefs. We should be very careful about writing off other people based entirely on their political opinions. Rather, we should attempt to persuade those who think differently than we do with reason, grace and biblical truth. 

Mercy is superior to judgment-

 I am a truth person. This reality is demonstrated in the fact that every spiritual gifts’ test I have ever taken I consistently scored lowest on mercy. Every. Single. Time. Even the times I tried to cheat and game the test I still scored dead last on mercy.  I am not proud of this fact but it is a fact. I fought against this fact for years and tried desperately to be softer and squishier than the way God made me. It took me a while to realize that people like me add something necessary to the body of Christ. We keep the feelers from getting excessively feely and the mercy folks from handing out cheap grace like it was fun-size candy on Halloween. That being said, with God mercy always wins out over judgment (James 2:13) and if I want to be like Jesus I have to embrace the grace and mercy He came to give. 

Responding to Hurt

I too will have my say; I too will tell what I know. For I am full of words, and the spirit within me compels me; inside I am like bottled-up wine, like new wineskins ready to burst~ Job 32:17-19 NIV

 My father-in-law died seventeen years ago without warning from a massive stroke. He was a good man, relatively  young and healthy. His death was an enormous shock. Immediately following the funeral one of his work colleagues “comforted” my husband by telling him he could “relate to his grief” because his dog had died the week before.

 I know a man in his sixties who still remembers with tears in his eyes the sting of having his first-grade teacher tell him he was struggling to learn to read because he was “dumb.”

 A friend suffered through the heartache of several miscarriages before giving birth to two healthy children. After each miscarriage at least one person told her that she should be grateful she miscarried because “there was probably something wrong with it anyway”.

 If had a dollar for every time some nitwit encouraged me in an overly calm tone to “just relax” when freaking out was clearly the reasonable option, I would be writing from a lawn chair on a sunny beach right now.  

 Words.

 Anyone who has lived longer than a decade in this world has undoubtedly been the casualty of stupid, hurtful or just plain thoughtless words. The most painful kind of hurtful words are words that attack things about ourselves that we cannot change, such as our looks or intellectual abilities. Insensitive words wound by getting inside our heads and altering how we see ourselves and view the world.

 God has a lot to say on the subject of words. The writer of Proverbs cautions his readers:“The tongue has the power of life and death.” 1st Corinthians thirteen teaches that one significant aspect of loving others well is avoiding the use of rude or boastful words. In Matthew 12:36 Jesus warns of looming judgment for those who habitually speak without carefully considering the impact their words might have on others.    

 Decent people agree that words should never be impulsively spoken or unnecessarily rude. No one should speak without carefully considering how they would feel if someone said the same thing to them if they found themselves in the same situation.

 All that being said, how we respond to the stupid stuff people say to us, is from a spiritual perspective, every bit as important as being careful about what we say to others. Responding with grace to hurtful words begins with the sometimes-difficult admission that we too have hurt others with our words just as we have been hurt by the thoughtless words of other people. I once informed a boy who declared his affection for me in a love note that I would never return his feelings because he “smelled weird” (proof-positive that sometimes mean things are also true). I still squirm when I think about some of the hurtful “guidance” I hastily doled out to others when I was beyond old enough to know better.

 There is an inclination in our day and age for people, even Christian people, to take hurtful words to heart and nurture their hurt by ruminating on hurtful words rather than choosing to forgive and move on. Nurturing hurt does nothing but create a breeding ground for bitterness and inevitably leads us to use our wounds as a justification to:

  1. Shut the offender out of our lives completely.
  2. Gossip about their lack of empathy to any who will listen.
  3. Freak out, say whatever is on OUR minds and then demand an apology that the offender probably won’t mean even if they do say it.

 All of the above reactions feel great but are categorically wrong. Each one feeds our sin nature, shuts down communication and effectively ends the relationship. Offense and unresolved hurt over careless words are the devil’s preferred playground. Offense keeps us self-focused, bitter and unable to see ourselves or others clearly.

 Letting go of hurt is not easy. We have to discipline our minds to take the hurt we feel to God and ask Him to empower us to let go of hurt, rather than hang on to it. We must be willing to pray that people who say foolish, mean or hurtful things, will become more self-aware and we must choose forgiveness every time.